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Sirius Updates

March 25th, 2022

New commissioning stage of Imbuia beamline allows the use of advanced infrared spectroscopy techniques at micro and nano scales

Imbuia experimental station received its first synchrotron beam today, after being connected to the Sirius electron accelerators. It became the only research infrastructure in the world to benefit from infrared radiation generated from a fourth-generation synchrotron accelerator, on the frontier of this type of technology. The beamline was designed to carry out experiments that allow analyzing the chemical composition of virtually any material and conducting frontier research into new materials, with special emphasis on organic materials, both biological and synthetic. Through spectroscopy techniques, it will allow exploring properties even of materials composed of few atomic layers.

February 11th, 2022

CARNAÚBA’s experimental station has detectors for simultaneous X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, X-ray excited optical luminescence and X-ray ptychography techniques, and is operating, during commissioning phase, from 6.4 keV to 14 keV

CARNAÚBA is the longest beamline on Sirius, the new synchrotron light source from the Brazilian Center for Research in Energy and Materials (CNPEM), private non-profit organization under the supervision of the Brazilian Ministry of Science, Technology, and Innovations (MCTI). Due to the almost 145-meter distance between the light source and the sample environment, it is possible to produce a high optical demagnification and achieve spatial resolutions in the order of nanometers.

December 1st, 2021

First 3D imaging experiments at Sirius were performed using ptychographic nanotomography

Researchers from the CATERETÊ beamline have succeeded in the very first measurements of 2D and 3D imaging at Sirius, the new Brazilian synchrotron light source of the Brazilian Center for Research in Energy and Materials, a private non-profit organization under the supervision of the Brazilian Ministry of Science, Technology, and Innovations (MCTI).

The CATERETÊ beamline is dedicated to coherent and time-resolved scattering experiments. Experiments such as coherent X-ray diffractive imaging (CXDI) and X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) are at the core of the beamline's activities, as well as time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS).

October 18th, 2021

This call for proposals intends to supply beamtime for the users during the beamline commissioning period

The Sirius project has reached another milestone in commissioning its accelerators and beamlines. Five new beamlines are entering the scientific commissioning stage, completing the number of six beamlines available for the user community. In addition to the beamlines, we have officially also opened two support laboratories and the scientific computing center. These facilities were officially inaugurated during a ceremony on October 8th.

July 22nd, 2021

Paper, which is part of the special issue of the Journal of Molecular Biology, reveals unprecedented details of the maturation process of the main protease of the SARS-CoV-2 virus

The first study with data collected by researchers using Sirius has just been published. Sirius is the state-of-the-art synchrotron light source of the Brazilian Center for Research in Energy and Materials (CNPEM), a private non-profit organization under the supervision of the Brazilian Ministry of Science, Technology, and Innovations (MCTI). The work, published in a special issue of the Journal of Molecular Biology, reveals details of the maturation process of the main protease of the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

July 19th, 2021

In addition to the MANACÁ beamline, which is already in scientific commissioning, CARNAÚBA and CATERETÊ are also moving from technical to scientific commissioning and should soon receive the first users in this phase

The operation of the synchrotron light source Sirius in the first semester of 2021 divided the human resources and uptime of the accelerators between machine studies, installation of beamline components, and beamtime for technical and scientific commissioning experiments of the beamlines.

July 19th, 2021

In the first semester, greater emphasis was placed on improving beam stability, operating at higher currents, as well as optimizing the injector system

The operation of the synchrotron light source Sirius in the first semester of 2021 divided the human resources and uptime of the accelerators between machine studies, installation of beamline components, and beamtime for technical and scientific commissioning experiments of the beamlines.

October 20th, 2020

LNLS opens a call for proposals in other research areas for macromolecular crystallography experiments

In the last few months, the first experiments on the MANACÁ beamline were carried out by external researchers dedicated to studying the molecular mechanisms related to the action of the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

Now, continuing the scientific commissioning phase of this beamline, researchers from other fields are invited to submit their proposals to use the MANACÁ beamline, dedicated to macromolecule crystallography, which allows the study of the three-dimensional structure of human proteins and enzymes and pathogens, with atomic resolution.

September 10th, 2020

Little-understood protein from the SARS-Cov-2 virus is one of the targets of the study by researchers from USP at the synchrotron light source

In response to the pandemic, the Brazilian Center for Research in Energy and Materials (CNPEM), a private non-profit organization under the supervision of the Brazilian Ministry of Science, Technology, and Innovations (MCTI), anticipated the opening of Sirius' first beamline to support research related to Covid-19. Researchers from the University of São Paulo (USP) were the first users of the largest and most complex scientific infrastructure in Brazil.

July 11th, 2020

Crystals of SARS-CoV-2 proteins were the first samples analyzed

The new Brazilian synchrotron light source, Sirius, from the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS) at the Brazilian Center for Research in Energy and Materials (CNPEM), carried out the first experiments on one of its beamlines this week. The first research station to start operating, still in the commissioning stage, can reveal details of the structure of biological molecules, such as viral proteins. These first experiments are part of an effort by CNPEM to provide a cutting-edge tool to the Brazilian scientific community working in SARS-CoV-2 research.