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Accelerators

Sirius is one of the most advanced synchrotron light sources in the world. This great scientific equipment has at its core state-of-the-art particle accelerators, capable of producing and controlling the movement of electrons at speeds close to the speed of light, which generate synchrotron light, a special type of light capable of revealing the microscopic structure of organic and inorganic materials. Are you curious? Click here to learn more!

Sirius 3-GeV 518-meter storage ring comprises a 20-cell 5BA magnetic lattice, designed to achieve an emittance of 0.25 nm rad,  making Sirius one of the brightest synchrotron light sources in the world. During 2020, the light source operation time was split between the still ongoing machine commissioning and beamline commissioning with 40 mA stored electron beam, in decay mode. When the superconducting RF cavities replace the normal conducting RF cavities currently in use, the machine will operate with 350 mA, in top-up mode.

Check out below technical information regarding the electron accelerators that make up the synchrotron light source Sirius.

Accelerator Status and Operation Schedule

Check out below the current status and operation schedule of the synchrotron light source Sirius.

Accelerator Parameters

To produce synchrotron light, it is necessary to use particle accelerators capable of producing and controlling the movement of high-energy electrons at speeds close to the speed of light. A synchrotron light source is composed of two main sets of particle accelerators: an Injector System and a Storage Ring. The main parameters of these systems can be found below.

Accelerator Subsystems

In addition to the magnetic lattice, the conditioning of the electron beam in the accelerators requires an ultra-high vacuum chamber that delimits the region traversed by the electrons, radiofrequency cavities used to replace the energy lost by the electrons in the form of radiation, and a set of auxiliary systems that allow the particle accelerator to function as a whole. The main subsystems that make up the accelerators of a synchrotron light source are described below.